Ethiopian Boeing 737-8 MAX Crash in Bishoftu Ethiopia

Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737-8 MAX Flight ET-302 had just taken off from Addis Ababa in Ethiopia en route to Nairobi Kenya when radar contact was lost, and the plane crashed. 149 passengers and 8 crew were lost. The impact occurred near Bishoftu, Ethiopia 17 m SSE of Addis Ababa. Ethiopian Airlines announced that no survivors were found. People from 33 different countries were aboard.
On Mar 10th 2019 Ethiopian Airlines reported that the crew reported difficulties and requested a return to Addis Ababa.

BBC Africa reported aboard were 32 Kenyan, 18 Canadian, 9 Ethiopian,8 Chinese, 8 Italian, 8 American,7 French, 7 British, 6 Egyptian, 5 Dutch, 4 UN passports, 4 Indian, 3 Russian, 2 Moroccan, 2 Israeli, 1 Belgian, 1 Ugandan, 1 Yemeni, 1 Sudanese, 1 Togolese, 1 Mozambican, 1 Norwegian

Ethiopian Airlines said:


Boeing said:

Remembering September 11, 2011, Long May We Wave

This day we are threatened by nature. Yesterday, the winds of Hurricane Harvey hammered Texas, and tomorrow Irma will be slamming Florida. It is a storm we will weather. We know we will, because we have lived through worse. We must remember this, because today is September tenth. And September 11, 2011 is a date no American can forget, marked as it is by four scars that will never heal. Four hijacked airliners carved the names of nearly three thousand victims into our memories, names written in blood. Three thousand names with more than three thousand families—and that is not even adding the number of injured, the number of rescuers, all losses that destroyed the innocence of our country. We were initiated on that day into a sad new world, scarred by tragedy that turned the sky from blue to red. How could we understand what was going on? The mass murder of our people, the senseless destruction, the planes crashing, buildings burning before our eyes. I’m just an ordinary guy. When it happened, I was bewildered by it all.

On Sept 11, this day, in 2011, Flight 11 and Flight 175 hit the twin towers.

The tragedy was filmed as it happened. We were glued to our screens, helpless, terrorized, mesmerized along with the international audience, the terrible scenes of desperate people making impossible choices: die in the burning towers, or jump to the unforgiving pavement. We cried, but we did not cry alone. The world cried with us.

American Airlines Flight 77 hit the Pentagon, 64 aboard the plane and 125 in the impact, all fatalities.

On Flight 93, we saw our people become heroes. We learned of Burnett, Beamer, and Bradshaw, of passengers fighting the hijackers. “Are you guys ready? Let’s roll.” They rolled into history as heroes. How many lives they saved by their actions—an incalculable number—and these were passengers who acted against the hijackers knowing they would lose their own.

Children of today who ride airplanes are accustomed to today’s security protocols. It must be impossible for them to believe that there was a time when we simply walked aboard. There was no threat. But these days are different. We live in a world that irrevocably changed that day. It is a day we can never forget.

We tightened our belts.
We sharpened our defenses.
And we are not alone in this. The whole world is a more vigilant place.

The twin towers were a symbol of our prosperity, a couple of the world’s greatest buildings in one of the world’s greatest cities; and though the towers stand no more, our cities and our country goes on. The Pentagon was rebuilt. A Pennsylvania park commemorates the heroes of Flight 93.

I certainly mourn those who were lost on September 11; and I feel for the families of the injured, as I believe we all do. I may mourn our loss of innocence, but I can also take pride that we stand now, scarred perhaps, but stronger because of what we have survived. We have taken measures to make our world safer, but we can never relax our vigilance. We can never such a thing to happen to us again. On the ashes of the towers, we rebuilt. Some of us are still rebuilding. On the ashes of history, we rise.

JetBlue Flight Diverts to Philadelphia due to Smoke in Cockpit

JetBlue flight B6-1097 had to divert and make an emergency landing in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on August 29th.

The Airbus A320-200 plane heading from Boston, Massachusetts, to Atlanta, Georgia, was diverted after the crew noticed smoke in the cockpit.

The plane landed safely. All one hundred and three people aboard remained unharmed.

Cape Air Flight Makes Emergency Landing at Adirondack Regional Airport

Cape Air flight 1815 made an emergency landing at Adirondack Regional Airport in Franklin County, New York, on August 25th.

The Cessna 402 plane heading from Albany International Airport to Ogdensburg Regional Airport, New York, was diverted after the crew noticed an engine issue and a whiff of smoke in the cabin.

The plane landed safely. All five passengers aboard remained unharmed.

NAM Air Plane Returns to Indonesia after Engine Shut Down

NAM Air flight IN-750 had to return and make an emergency landing at Nabire Airport, Papua, Indonesia, on July 20th.

The Avions de Transport Regional ATR-72-212A flying to Biak, Indonesia, had to return because the crew had to shut one of its engines down.

The plane landed safely.

No one was injured.

Tam, a Letter of Remembrance


Dear Tam Families,
On this day, 7/17/17, I just reread the transcript of TAM flight JJ-3054. I never knew those people aboard that plane, but I knew their families. I remember the families of these lost passengers. I remember your heartbreak and your loss. Ten years have passed. I hope you have had ten years of healing.

On this day, 7/17/2007, TAM flight JJ-3054 flew into history, taking with it all 187 passengers and crew, and twelve people on the ground. Tonight, I wanted to be that good friend who remembers the date, but not the pain. I was there with you, and I remember you were towers of strength, getting through the hardest time of all. What I hope is that time has healed your wounds, and that you can remember the music and joy that filled your loved ones lives. Remember the good things. The love. The laughter. The connection. May you continue to carry with you all the good memories. I share my heartfelt condolences to all the families. I was there with you, then. I am with you now in spirit. I will never forget.

$290.6 Million in Infrastructure Grants

U.S. DOT Announces $290.6 Million in Infrastructure Grants to 105 Airports

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Transportation announced the FAA is awarding $ 290.6 million in airport infrastructure grants to 105 airports. The airport grant program funds airport infrastructure projects, runways, taxiways, and airport signage, lighting, and markings. “AIP grants will allow airports to complete critical airport infrastructure projects that will help maintain the safety of the nation’s airports,” said FAA Administrator Michael P. Huerta. The grants will provide many jobs. AIP funding is allocated based on passenger volume. If their capital project needs exceed their available entitlement funds, then the FAA can supplement their entitlements with discretionary funding. The FAA is currently providing discretionary funding to 26 airports based on their high-priority project needs.

List of Airports

FY17-AIP-Grants-Ready-to-Go-2017-07-17

FAA and Singapore Sign Aviation Safety Agreement

FAA and Singapore Sign Aviation Safety Agreement

SINGAPORE—The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) signed a milestone Maintenance Agreement Guidance (MAG) yesterday with the Civil Aviation Authority of Singapore (CAAS). The agreement allows for mutual surveillance conducted on certified repair stations located abroad for each of the agreement partners.

It provides guidance for the implementation of the previously agreed-upon. In cases where there are sufficient certificated facilities in both partner countries, MIPs may reduce the number of surveillance activities, free up inspector resources for the authorities, and reduce the regulatory burden on industry. There are 58 FAA-approved repair stations located in Singapore.

The MAG furthers the Maintenance Implementation Procedures (MIP) agreement signed by FAA Administrator Michael Huerta and CAAS on February 16, 2016. That agreement was the first of its kind in Asia and reduces costs by allowing the reciprocal acceptance of Singapore and the United States’ surveillance of maintenance work.

The MIP and MAG permits reliance on each other’s surveillance systems to the greatest extent possible while maintaining safety. Agreements such as the MIP allow for greater efficiency and ultimately save valuable industry and authority resources. The FAA and the CAAS have agreed to conduct surveillance on each other’s behalf to ensure compliance with the respective regulatory requirements for maintenance and the applicable Special Conditions. Both agreements build on the 2004 U.S-Singapore Bilateral Safety Agreement (BASA) which has benefitted both countries by saving time and reducing costs in aircraft design and manufacturing.

FAA Assistant Administrator for NextGen James Eck and Executive Director for International Affairs Carey Fagan are participating in the World Civil Aviation Chief Executives Forum this week in Singapore as part of the agency’s continued collaboration with Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) member states.

As part of the strong U.S.-Singapore bilateral relationship, the FAA and the CAAS also partner under Singapore’s Air Traffic Management Center of Excellence to expand understanding and build Air Traffic Management capacity in the region.

Marine Corps Crash Kills 16. Total Loss


A Marine Corps C-130 departed from the Mid-South Base in Millington, Tennessee and crashed in Mississippi in Leflore County in Itta Bena just off Highway 82 in a soybean field. Reports say the plane exploded in mid-air. Bodies were found more than a mile from the crash site. The debris field covered a radius of five miles. Witnesses report seeing the plane spiraling down with one engine on fire. The way the debris was scattered on both sides of the highway leads investigators to believe the explosion happened prior to the crash. The plane was loaded with ammunition. The cause of the crash is under investigation.

Egyptair Flight MS804 Almost A Year Later

Elements of this image are furnished by NASA

Egyptair Flight MS804 (AKA EgyptAir Flight 804) was a Paris to Cairo flight that ended in the Mediterranean on May 19, 2016. Sixty-six people lost their lives: three security crew, fifty-six passengers, seven crew.

Egyptian authorities published a progress report on 28/06/16 that the BEA repaired the recorders. On 17/06 that the Technical Investigation Committee of the A320 accident studied FDR data as well as performing time correlation between FDR and CVR data and cockpit voice recordings before the occurrence of the accident where the existence of a “fire” was mentioned. That report did not determine the reason or location where that fire occurred. Smoke was reported during the flight in the bathroom and the avionics bay.

The investigation has been fraught with controversy. On 22 May, 2016, M6 (French TV) reported that a pilot told Cairo air traffic control about smoke in the cabin, and the pilot consequently made an emergency descent.

On May 20th 2016 The Aviation Herald received information from three independent channels, that ACARS (Aircraft Communications Addressing and Reporting System) messages with following content were received from the aircraft:

  • 00:26Z 3044 ANTI ICE R WINDOW
  • 00:26Z 561200 R SLIDING WINDOW SENSOR
  • 00:26Z 2600 SMOKE LAVATORY SMOKE
  • 00:27Z 2600 AVIONICS SMOKE
  • 00:28Z 561100 R FIXED WINDOW SENSOR
  • 00:29Z 2200 AUTO FLT FCU 2 FAULT
  • 00:29Z 2700 F/CTL SEC 3 FAULT
  • no further ACARS messages were received.

No sooner did the report come out that the Egyptian Civil Aviation Ministry dismissed it as false.

One truism I have found in accident investigation is that it takes time to find the truth. Another is that facts can be misleading. Reportage from official sources moves slowly; reportage from commercial, so-called “news,” or social sources is frequently speculative, unsourced, or purely imaginary. Sometimes it is actually correct. It is difficult to tell the difference. Contradictions are a frequent finding, such as this:

  • Le Figaro reported that no explosives were found on Egyptair flight MS804 French victims’ bodies. The flight crashed in the Mediterranean in 2016.
  • On Dec 15th 2016 Egypt’s Civil Aviation Authority announced that forensic examination on behalf of the Accident Investigation Commission found traces of explosives with some of the human remains recovered. In accordance with Egypt law, the states prosecutor was informed, and a technical commission formed by the prosecution office opened their investigation into the crime.

How does a close reader respond to a statement that “traces of explosives were found WITH human remains?” A close reader finds more questions. With the remains is not ON the remains. But it could be either way since we are dealing with languages. In English, WITH the remains could mean a bomb was floating in the water near the bodies, or ashes, or gasoline or TNT residue. And what constitutes near? Inches? Miles? It all is relative. Or if the original report is loosely translated, did the original document use a preposition such as ON the remains? And then, there are the forensic questions. Were explosive remains washed off of bodies that were submerged in the ocean?

If the case goes to court, the court will want to know if something failed on the plane, and if so, what it was. Manufacturers of failed components are considered responsible parties. No matter what the cause, international treaty determines carrier responsibility to the victims of the crash.

The determination of failed components provides additional responsible parties. The discovery of a bomb would make airport security one of the potential responsible parties. In addition, international treaty provides guidelines for what carriers owe to the families. (Which treaty is involved depends on which treaty/treaties the involved country/countries are signatory to. If it sounds like it can get complicated, you are correct.)

It has been nearly a year since the accident, and though some things may be believed in the court of public opinion to be one way or another, questions remain unanswered. How grievous and how difficult for the families that must wait so long to find out what brought about this tragedy that took their loved ones.

Germanwings Flight 9525. Remember.

Remember

Everyone aboard Germanwings Flight 9525 passed away on March 24, 2015.

One hundred fifty fatalities, from infant to senior. Passed away is a soft euphemism, not adequately reflecting the chasm left in those who were left behind. But the memory of those who were lost remains. If nothing else, the memory is an inheritance, even maybe a lesson to families to live in the moment. The families persist, still fighting on behalf of those they lost, for justice and compensation for something that can never truly be replaced. How sad that these lost souls had to travel to that point in place and time to lose their lives on a lonely mountain.

I believe these lost passengers and crew have left a legacy to their families, to be strong and proud and kind.

Strong in the backbone and endurance to brave the next day, knowing that gradually, each day carries a little less pain than the one before.

Proud in that strength of yesterday, today, and the time to come.

Kind in sharing compassion and empathy with the suffering of everyone aboard, everyone left behind, regardless.

I have met so many of these families. Their cause gives my life meaning. I will never forget them, and consider it an honor to fight alongside them for truth, for justice, and for equity.

FAA Aviation Safety Rating for Kenya

The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Aviation Administration has announced that Kenya complies with international safety standards. Kenya has been granted a Category 1 rating under the International Aviation Safety Assessment program.

Kenya’s civil aviation authority meets International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) standards. With a Category 1 rating, Kenyan air carriers can secure FAA and DOT authority can establish service to the United States and carry the code of U.S. carriers.

The FAA had not previously assessed Kenya’s civil aviation authority for compliance with ICAO standards. The rating is based on a February, 2017 FAA assessment of the safety oversight provided by Kenya’s Directorate General of Civil Aviation.

The agency assesses the civil aviation authorities of all countries with air carriers that have applied to fly to the United States, currently conduct operations to the United States, or participate in code sharing arrangements with U.S. partner airlines, and makes that information available to the public. The assessments determine if foreign civil aviation authorities meet ICAO safety standards, not FAA regulations.

To maintain a Category 1 rating, a country must adhere to ICAO safety standards, the United Nations’ technical agency for aviation that establishes international standards and recommended practices for aircraft operations and maintenance.

IASA information is posted at www.faa.gov/about/initiatives/iasa/.

NTSB reports on Clear Air Turbulence



Scheduled 14 CFR Part 121: Air Carrier operation of UNITED AIR LINES INC
Accident occurred Friday, February 19, 2010 in Anchorage, AK
Probable Cause Approval Date: 02/23/2017
Aircraft: BOEING 747, registration: N173UA
Injuries: 1 Serious, 25 Minor, 236 Uninjured.
NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On February 19, 2010, about 1452 Alaska standard time (AKST) (2352 UTC), United Airlines flight 897, a Boeing 747-400, N173UA, encountered severe turbulence during cruise descent between FL310 and FL300 about 100 miles west of Anchorage, Alaska. Of the 243 passengers and 19 crew members on board, 17 passengers and eight flight attendants (FA) received minor injuries and one FA received a serious injury. The airplane received minor damaged. The flight was operating under 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) part 121 as a regularly scheduled international passenger flight from Dulles International Airport (IAD), Washington, DC, to Narita International Airport (NRT), Narita, Japan.

Prior to the turbulence encounter, the flight crew received pilot reports (PIREPs) of moderate to severe turbulence above FL340 and that it was less at FL300. According to the flight crew, about one hour late, the flight began to encounter a few “light bumps” or intermittent light “chop.” The sky conditions were clear with good visibility. The captain turned on the “fasten seat belt” sign and made a public address (PA) announcement to fasten seat belts. The flight crew requested a descent to FL300 and began to encounter moderate turbulence after starting the descent. The first officer then made a PA announcement directing the flight attendants to “take your seats.” The autopilot remained engaged throughout the turbulence encounter, which lasted less than one minute.

After encountering the turbulence, the crew assessed airplane damage and checked the number and severity of injuries to passengers and crew. The crew was assisted in assessing passenger and crew injuries by a U.S. Army Special Forces medic who stated that all of the injuries were considered minor. All the FAs indicated that they were able to perform their required emergency duties for the remainder of the flight.

After discussing the injuries and the available diversion airports with the FAs, company dispatch and the medic, the flight crew decided to continue on to NRT since there were sufficient diversion airports along the route if the situation worsened.

Upon arrival in NRT, 16 passengers and one FA were transported to hospitals for medical evaluation. All were released with only minor injuries, however, the FA was re-evaluated by her personal physician when she returned home with the further diagnosis of a fractured rib.

Eastern Airways Flight Rejects Take Off From Isle of Man

Eastern Airways flight BA-3287 had to reject take off from Isle of Man, on February 17th.

The plane was accelerating to take off for London City Airport, United Kingdom, when the crew rejected take off due to an engine failure.

The plane safely returned to the apron. All passengers and crew members remained unharmed.

S7 Airlines Plane Makes Emergency Landing due to Brakes Problem

S7 Airlines flight S7-1148 made an emergency landing in Moscow, Russia, on February 6th.

The Airbus A320-200 plane flying from Krasnodar, Russia, was on final approach to Moscow when the crew reported a brakes problem and went around.

The plane landed safely. Everyone aboard remained unharmed.

FAA and Santa Monica Settlement

IATA: SMO ICAO: KSMO FAA LID: SMO
2006 USGS airphoto

WASHINGTON–The Federal Aviation Administration and Santa Monica, California agreed on the future of Santa Monica Airport.The city agrees to maintain continuous and stable operation of the airport until December 31, 2028. After that date, Santa Monica has the right to close the airport.Santa Monica can shorten the airport’s single runway from 4,973 to 3,500 feet and is obligated to enter into leases with private aeronautical service providers to ensure continuity of service, until it decides to provide services on its own.

Small Plane Crashed at Capitol Airport; WI

A small plane crashed while taking off from Capitol Airport in Brookfield, Wisconsin, on January 4th.

The plane went down when the pilot, his wife, and their infant son were traveling to Virginia.

The pilot and his wife were injured in the crash. They were taken to Froedtert Hospital.

The baby remained unharmed but was also taken to Children’s Hospital as a precaution.

The NTSB and the FAA are investigating.

SpiceJet Plane Rejects Take Off After Bird Strike

SpiceJetSpiceJet flight SG-182 rejected take off from Pune, Maharashtra, India, on August 23rd.

The Boeing 737-800 plane was accelerating to take off for Delhi when a bird hit it, prompting the crew to reject the take off.

The plane safely returned to the apron. All 183 passengers and 6 crew members remained safe.

EgyptAir: Wreckage, Blackboxes located by “John Lethbridge”

The Egyptair Airbus A320 known as flight MS-804 that departed May 18th from Charles de Gaulle airport and disappeared over the Mediterranean in Egyptian airspace apparently has been found. Jun 15th 2016 Egypt’s Civil Aviation Authority reported that the “John Lethbridge” identified A320 wreckage locations. Currently the area in question is being mapped, part of the planning process of wreckage recovery.

Fifty-six passengers and ten crew died in the wreckage.

* Update: Black boxes both recovered.

Egypt’s announcement:11

Egypt’s announcement:10

Egypt’s announcement:9

Egypt’s announcement:8

Pinging for Egyptair MS 804 as the Clock Runs Out

When a plane goes down in the ocean, the black boxes aboard have enough juice to ping for thirty days. The pingers on flight data recorders AKA “black boxes” last a minimum of 30 days. After 30 days, the devices are still active, but the sound on which searchers hone is expected to die out. The pinger is located by a “pinger locater,” a device that listens for the sound of the black box. It is towed within the search area but it’s listening radius is usually around 2 miles. The pinger’s sound is not very powerful, and the pinger is towed at 3 knots.
220px-ULBeacon

After AirFrance 447, legislation was underway to increase the battery life to 90 days. The technology exists, but because implementation of that transition has been slow, EgyptAir MS 804’s pinger battery is expected to expire at around 30 days.

EgyptAir: 3 Alerts Before the Plane Left Radar. Fire on board.

Several different alerts on this plane went off immediately prior to the plane disappearing from the radar, including 1) issues with the windows on the co-pilot’s side of the plane; 2) two smoke alerts, the first one “SMOKE LAVATORY SMOKE” at 00:26 a.m. local time; 3) the second one “AVIONICS SMOKE” at 00:27 a.m. The second alert refers smoke in the avionics bay, which is located below the cockpit, and is where the electronics are housed.

This is also the same plane that was vandalised two years ago at Cairo Airport. In Arabic someone, presumably Cairo Airport workers, wrote on its belly, “We will bring this plane down.”

It is a special concern that the plane had flown to Eritrea.

The US State Department has a standing travel warning for Eritrea, and is quoted as saying “security at the Asmara airport ‘can be unpredictable,’ and had a ‘lack of efficiency and consistency” in screening passengers.'”

The search for Egyptair is still underway.

On the search for Egyptair Flight MS804

According to AV:

on 2016/06/01, Egypt’s Civil Aviation Authority reported “Laplace” located pings presumably from one of MS804’s black boxes. The vessel “John Lethbridge” of DOS will be joining the search team to retrieve the black boxes. The BEA (FR)confirmed that Egyptian Authorities have confirmed a “signal that may come from one of the recorders” of flight MS-804. The BEA did NOT confirm that a black box has been located.

Debris has been found.

LGW Airlines Plane Makes Emergency Landing in Munich

LGW Airlines flight AB-8683 made an emergency landing in Munich, Germany, on May 23rd.

The plane, heading from Bologna, Italy, to Dusseldorf, Germany, was diverted after a propeller over-speed indication prompted the crew to shut down one of the engines.

The plane landed safely. No injuries were reported.

Remembering Air India Express Flight 812

Memory

On May 22nd, I took a few moments to remember Air India Express Flight 812.

I remembered when I went to Mangelore, where I’d walked the path the Boeing had taken when it overshot its landing. I tried not to revisit the tragedy of it all. I tried not to remember that if that cockpit had not been the site of the crew resource management issues, I might have had no disaster to remember. Hindsight vision is always sadly perfect.

There were eight survivors of that flight, and a hundred and fifty-eight fatalities. The plane ploughed through all barriers, arrestor beds and an antennae, and catapulted over the edge of the runway down a hill. Afterwards a support group was formed for the families, but all the emotional support in the world can never replace missing loved ones. I can only hope they visited you in your dreams.

All I want to say to the lost family members and the survivors is to treasure your memories. The cords of memories weave together the threads that make our lives, stretching from every point living and dead, and every heart we touch. As long as we remember the ones we love, that is how long they will stay with us.

TAM Airlines Plane Makes Emergency Landing in Brazil

TAMTAM Airlines flight JJ-3289 had to return and make an emergency landing at Sao Paulo–Guarulhos International Airport in Brazil, on April 26th.

The Airbus A321-200 plane took off for Porto Alegre, Brazil, but had to return shortly afterwards after its right hand engine ingested a bird.

The plane landed uneventfully. There were 211 people aboard at the time; all of them remained safe.

The airline arranged a replacement plane for the passengers.

Four Lost in Fatal Cessna Accident in Birchwood Alaska

SzA1BP58Ka
After taking off from Birchwood, a privately owned Cessna 172P Skyhawk crashed and burned in a forest close to Birchwood Airport, in Birchwood Alaska. Pilot/owner George Kobelnyk, 64, co-pilot Christian Bohrer, 20, Sarah Glaves, 36, and Kyle Braun, 27 all died in the crash. A post impact fire destroyed much of the evidence in the debris field. Kobelnyk not only had his flight instructor certification, but also had worked for the NTSB and the FAA. Locals heard the plane was flying low before it crashed but the cause of the accident is unknown. The impact blaze started a forest fire that also had to be handled. The accident is under investigation by the NTSB, FAA, Cessna, and Lycoming who manufactured the engines. The first responders included the Chugiak Fire Department and police department. The NTSB expressed condolences.