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Category: <span>GE</span>

Jury Awards 2008 Helicopter Crash Victims, GE Loses $177 million Judgment

What: GE Engines in Sikorsky S-61N helicopter
Where: Portland Courtroom
When: Aug. 5, 2008 crash, March 28, 2012 Jury decision
Who: 9 crash fatalities
Why: The Aug. 5, 2008 crash occurred after a loss of power in the No. 2 engine shortly after takeoff from a nearly 6,000-foot-high mountaintop in the Shasta-Trinity National Forest.

Co-pilot William Coultas of Cave Junction, his wife, Chris, and the widow of pilot Roark Schwanenberg, 54, of Lostine were awarded $37 million and his wife $4.3 million by the jury, while the estate of Schwanenberg was awarded $28.4 million, according to The Associated Press. The jury placed 57 percent of the blame on GE, but also found the helicopter’s owner and its manufacturer partially at fault. Coultas is the only surviving crewman.

Fatalities include David Steele, 19, Ashland; Shawn Blazer, 30, Medford; Scott Charlson, 25, Phoenix; Matthew Hammer, 23, Grants Pass; Edrik Gomez, 19, Ashland; Bryan Rich, 29, Medford; and Steven “Caleb” Renno, 21, Cave Junction; U.S. Forest Service check pilot Jim Ramage, 63, of Redding, Calif.. Richard Schroeder Jr., Jonathan Frohreich and Michael Brown survived with injuries.

The case hinged on a problem with the engine’s fuel control valve. Evidence included a GE internal email from Aug. 6, 2008 discussing the size of the fuel filter, noting that the military version removes much smaller particles than the commercial version.

Official NTSB Report:
On August 5, 2008, about 1941 Pacific daylight time, a Sikorsky S-61N helicopter, N612AZ, impacted trees and terrain during the initial climb after takeoff from Helispot 44 (H-44), located at an elevation of about 6,000 feet in mountainous terrain near Weaverville, California. The pilot-in-command, the safety crewmember, and seven firefighters were fatally injured; the copilot and three firefighters were seriously injured. Impact forces and a postcrash fire destroyed the helicopter, which was being operated by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) as a public flight to transport firefighters from H-44 to another helispot. The USFS had contracted with Carson Helicopters, Inc. (CHI) of Grants Pass, Oregon, for the services of the helicopter, which was registered to CHI and leased to Carson Helicopter Services, Inc. of Grants Pass. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and a company visual flight rules flight plan had been filed.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The following actions by Carson Helicopters: 1) the intentional understatement of the helicopter’s empty weight, 2) the alteration of the power available chart to exaggerate the helicopter’s lift capability, and 3) the practice of using unapproved above-minimum specification torque in performance calculations that, collectively, resulted in the pilots relying on performance calculations that significantly overestimated the helicopter’s load-carrying capacity and did not provide an adequate performance margin for a successful takeoff; and insufficient oversight by the U.S. Forest Service and the Federal Aviation Administration.

Contributing to the accident was the failure of the flight crewmembers to address the fact that the helicopter had approached its maximum performance capability on their two prior departures from the accident site because they were accustomed to operating at the limit of the helicopter’s performance.

Contributing to the fatalities were the immediate, intense fire that resulted from the spillage of fuel upon impact from the fuel tanks that were not crash resistant, the separation from the floor of the cabin seats that were not crash resistant, and the use of an inappropriate release mechanism on the cabin seat restraints.

GE Selected as Engine Supplier for Next-Generation Military Helicopter

GE Aviation has been selected by Sikorsky Aircraft as a member of a newly-formed team that is building a next-generation helicopter for evaluation by the U.S. military. GE Aviation will provide the engine to enable the aircraft — designated the S-97 RAIDERTM helicopter – to demonstrate state-of-the-art advancements in rotorcraft technology.
GE is among 35 companies nationwide announced as preferred suppliers by Sikorsky on Jan. 12 during the Association of the United States Army (AUSA) Aviation symposium at National Harbor, MD, near Washington DC.

“We are pleased and excited to have been chosen to participate in the RAIDER helicopter project,” said John Martin, GE’s T700 Advanced Programs Manager. “Our longstanding partnership with Sikorsky has generated some of our most successful helicopter programs. We look forward to collaborating with the entire RAIDER team and having the opportunity to showcase our latest engine technologies.”

Germany: Singapore Airlines Runway Excursion


Click to view full size photo at Airliners.net
Contact photographer Bastian Ding

What: Singapore Airlines Boeing 777-312ER en route from Manchester to München-Franz Josef Strauss Airport, Germany
Where: Germany
When: Nov 3, 2011 at 12:14
Who: 158 passengers
Why: Although there were problems presented to ATC in advance, on landing in Munich, the Singapore Airlines Boeing suffered a runway excursion, when it veered right on landing. Landing occurred with reduced visibility and low cloud cover. All three gear were off the runway when the plane stopped. Passengers evacuated with no injuries via stairs brought to the jet.

The three year old jet has General Electric GE90 engines and appears to have suffered no obvious damage.

May 2011 Saab Crash in Argentina


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Contact photographer Alberto U.

What: Sol Linaeas Aereas Saab 340A
Where: 20 km (12.5 mls) N of Prahuaniyeu, RN Argentina
When: May 18, 2011
Who: 3 crew, 19 passengers
Why: After the last radio contact at 20:50, the aircraft crashed near Los Menucos en-route Neuquen to Comodoro after declaring an emergency and requesting descent out of icing conditions. There were no survivors of the 19 passengers and 3 crew.

There were newspaper reports of the flight coming down as a fireball, but that has been interpreted as journalistic license. We apologize if our translations reported this incident as a falling fireball when the fire apparently began after ground impact.

The pilot asked to descend from 5.800 meters to 4.300 due to ice. In the last communication ATC was informed that “the flight was was at 1.000 metres and going back to NQN.”

Wing Icing and a failure of the inlet deicing system is being considered as responsible. The black boxes were recovered.

The investigation is ongoing.

LA JUNTA DE INVESTIGACIONES DE ACCIDENTES DE AVIACIÓN CIVIL YA ESTÁ TRABAJANDO EN EL ACCIDENTE DEL VUELO 5428 DE SOL

Single Survivor Pulled from Crash


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Contact photographer Robert Matthews

What: United Nations – UN/Georgian Airways Canadair CL600 2B19 Regional Jet CRJ-100ER on the return trip from Kinshasa-N’Djili Airport (FIH) to Kisangani (FKI) and Entebbe (and back)
Where: Kinshasa-N’Djili Airport, Congo
When: 04 APR 2011 2 pm.
Who: 4 crew, 29 passengers
Why: On landing in Kinsasha, the United Nations plane encountered rainy weather and crashed at the end of the runway, breaking into several pieces. Witnesses say the plane encountered windshear at 65 feet and fell straight down. At least eight were thrown from the plane when it broke. There were 32 fatalities. There was one survivor. The crew was composed of Georgians.

The rain helped put out the fire, according to firefighters. The black box was recovered.

The lone survivor, Francis Mwamba, a Congolese journalist, was taken to Biamba Marie Mutombo hospital.

The plane was also reported as a Fokker.

Airzena Georgian Airways made this statement:

“Airzena Georgian Airways” regrets to confirm an accident occurred at Kinshasa airport, capital of Democratic Republic of Congo on 4 April, 10 at 13:00 GMT.The flight was operated under UN mission by aircraft of type CRJ-100 enroute from Goma to Kinshasa. The landing was performed in adverse weather conditions. The aircraft sufferred crash landing, broke up into parts and caught fire.

According to the currently available information crew and passengers died in the accident. The number is specified.

The accident is being investigated officially to determine its possible cause.

“Airzena Georgian Airways” is deeply shocked about the accident and expresses its condolences to the family members of the perished.


View Kinshasa Airport,congo in a larger map

UN Plane Crashes in Stormy Congo


Click to view full size photo at Airliners.net
Contact photographer Robert Matthews

What: United Nations/Georgian Airways Canadair CL-600-2B19 Regional Jet CRJ-100ER en route from Kinshasa-N’Djili Airport (FIH) to Kisangani (FKI) and Entebbe (EBB), Uganda and back.
Where: Kinshasa-N’Djili Airport (FIH) Congo
When: 04 APR 2011 2 pm local time
Who: 29 passengers 3 crew
Why: On the final leg of the flight, the plane crashed in rainy weather. The pilot attempted a landing in heavy rain, and broke in two. There were some who initially survived who were taken to Biamba Marie Mutombo hospital in the town of Masina, which is fifteen minutes from the Kinshasa airport. Twenty UN workers were aboard. The plane ignited on contact.

One person survived the crash according to a UN Farhan Haq spokesman.

* A second source said the plane was a Fokker 834.


HAL and GE Aviation Sign Contract for Hawk Aircraft Components

Bengaluru, INDIA– GE Aviation and India’s premium public sector Aerospace Company Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL) have signed 30-year contract that covers license to carry out repairs and overhaul of various avionics, instruments and hydraulic products for the Hawk Mk132 aircraft, an Advanced Jet Trainer operated by the Indian Air Force.

This license will provide in-house repair and overhaul capabilities to HAL for GE Aviation products and reduce turn-around-time for the repairs. HAL will build its maintenance, repair and overhaul capabilities at its Bangalore and Korwa facilities in India. The current schedule calls for the Bangalore facility to be certified for repair and overhaul of hydraulics and instruments and the Korwa facility to be certified for avionics.

As part of the license agreement, GE will develop, supply and commission the test equipment and supply technical data. The agreement also includes training, technical support, post design services for one year, and spares services.

“HAL has more than 70 years of providing high quality manufacturing, research and development, and repair and overhaul services in India,” said Nalin Jain, country director for GE Aviation. “Adding overhaul for avionics, instruments and hydraulic products is the perfect expansion of HAL’s capabilities.”

Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL) is a Navaratna Status Public Sector Undertaking under the Ministry of Defense. HAL has 19 Production Units and nine Research and Design Centers in seven locations in India. The Company has an impressive product track record – 15 types of aircraft manufactured with in-house R & D and 14 types produced under license. HAL’s current products with in-house R & D include Tejas, the Light Combat Aircraft, Dhruv, the Advance Light Helicopter and the Light Combat Helicopter. HAL has manufactured more than 3,640 aircraft, 4,000 engines and overhauled more than 9,400 aircraft and 29,800 engines. http://www.hal-india.com

Aircraft Industries Purchases GE’s M601 and H80 Engines for L410 Aircraft

–EVENDALE, OHIO– Aircraft Industries, a Czech-based aircraft manufacturer, signed a five-year sales agreement with GE Aviation for the purchase of M601 and H80 engines. The engine agreement is for the L410-UVP-E20 aircraft, a twin-engine commuter aircraft, with annual production of 10+ units.

“GE is proud to enter into this strategic partnership with Aircraft Industries, our first H80 engine agreement for the commuter segment,” said Paul Theofan, president and managing executive of GE Aviation’s Business and General Aviation Turboprops. “Currently, the majority of L410 aircraft are flying in Russia, South America, and Africa, and we’re looking forward to growing the fleet in other regions with the GE H80-powered L410.”

The H80 engine features significantly advanced hot-day takeoff performance and high-altitude cruise speeds, which will enable the L410 to operate in additional locations.

Aircraft Industries plans to complete GE H80-powered L410 aircraft certification by mid-2012. Once introduced, the company will also offer an H80 engine replacement on already produced aicraft powered by M601 engines. The L410 aircraft first entered service in 1969, More than 1,100 units have been produced, and there are more than 450 aircraft in service today.

Aircraft Industries, located in Kunovice, Czech Republic, and formerly known as LET Kunovice, specializes in the production of L410 aircraft. The company’s history dates back to the 1930’s, when it was founded as an aircraft repair shop, and all types of aircraft were repaired there after World War II. LET built a new plant in Kunovice in the 1950’s and designed its first general aviation category aircraft in 1957. Since then, Aircraft Industries has had a successful history in the manufacturing of crop spraying, jet training and glider aircraft, and of course, commuter aircraft, in which they now specialize.

GE Aviation’s Business & General Aviation Turboprops has more than 1,600 M601 engines in service that have accumulated more than 17 million flight hours on 30 applications. The H80 engine continues flight testing on the Thrush 510G aircraft. It is undergoing certification testing and will power business and general aviation, utility and agriculture aircraft. The H80 engine combines the elegant, robust design of the M601 engine with GE’s 3-D aerodynamic design techniques and advanced materials to create a more powerful, fuel-efficient, durable engine compared with the M601 engine, with no recurrent fuel nozzle inspections and no hot section inspection. The H80 engine will also feature an extended service life of 3,600 flight-hours or 6,600 cycles between overhauls. The H80 will provide the option of a single- or dual-acting governor, allowing customers flexibility in propeller selection.

Air India Signs OnPoint Solution Agreement for Its GE90 Engine Fleet

February 01, 2011
Air India Signs OnPoint Solution Agreement for Its GE90 Engine Fleet
–DUBAI– GE Aviation and India’s national carrier Air India have signed a 20-year OnPointSM solution agreement that covers its GE90 engines. The value of the agreement is not being released.

Air India will expand its maintenance, repair and overhaul (MRO) capabilities at its Mumbai, India facility to include GE90 engine overhaul. The current schedule calls for the Mumbai facility to be certified for basic GE90 MRO by 2012. Eventually, Air India plans to build a new MRO facility in Nagpur, India, that will include GE90 testing capabilities.

As part of the OnPoint solution agreement, GE will provide Air India with comprehensive material support, training and assistance on overhaul workscoping. While Air India develops its GE90 MRO capabilities, GE will provide the airline with overhaul services at GE’s MRO facilities to support the carrier’s GE90 engine fleet.

“Air India has more than 40 years of providing high-quality MRO services in India,” said Nalin Jain, country director for GE Aviation. “Adding GE90 engine overhaul service is the perfect expansion of Air India’s MRO capabilities.”

“Air India has already established partial capabilities on GE90 engines in Mumbai with the help of GE. Three engine overhauls were recently completed, saving us shipping costs and also reducing our turnaround time significantly. This will help us as we prepare to take on third-party work in the facility,” said Mr. K. M. Unni, SBU Head of the MRO SBU and Board Member, Air India.

Air India ordered 23 GE90-powered Boeing 777 aircraft in 2005 and currently operates 20 of these aircraft with the remaining three aircraft to be delivered in the next few years.

OnPoint solutions are flexible, long-term commitments designed to meet customers’ unique engine services needs. Backed by GE’s world-class support, these solutions help lower our customers’ cost-of-ownership and maximize the use of their assets. Available services include overhaul, on wing support, new and used serviceable parts, component repair, technology upgrades, engine leasing and diagnostics.

Air India is the pioneer airline in India and has been in operation since 1932. The airline operated its first international flight in June 1948. Air India, which is inducting new aircraft to modernize its fleet and expand operations, has 159 aircraft, including the state-of-the-art Boeing 777s, Airbus A321s, Airbus A319s and Boeing 737 -800 in its fleet. Air India flies to 62 destinations in India and 51 destinations around the world. The carrier has a strong technical base and its engineering facility includes maintenance of aircraft, overhaul of engines, repair and overhaul of components, accessories and avionics. Thus the airline can provide all technical support to its fleet. Air India has well-trained, skilled technical manpower to carry out all complex tasks connected with civil aviation maintenance. For information on Air India, visit www.airindia.in.

GE Aviation, an operating unit of GE (NYSE: GE), is a world-leading provider of jet and turboprop engines, components and integrated systems for commercial, military, business and general aviation aircraft. GE Aviation has a global service network to support these offerings. For more information, visit us at www.ge.com/aviation. Follow GE Aviation on Twitter at http://twitter.com/GEAviation and YouTube at http://www.youtube.com/user/GEAviation. For more information on ecomagination, visit http://www.ecomagination.com.

Alitalia Signs OnPoint Fuel & Carbon Solutions Agreement

–DUBAI– Alitalia has signed an OnPointSM Fuel & Carbon Solutions agreement with GE Aviation. Using proprietary decision software and fuel-consulting expertise, GE’s Fuel & Carbon Solutions will work with Alitalia to identify and track operational improvements that could reduce the airline’s fuel spend by an average of three percent on given segments.

“Alitalia has a strong focus on the environment and operates very fuel-efficient engines, including the GE90, CF34, CF6 and CFM56* engines,” said John Gough, leader of GE Aviation’s OnPoint Fuel and Carbon Solutions. “GE’s Fuel & Carbon Solutions will help the airline further reduce the amount of fuel that it burns, which will help reduce its emissions and significantly cut operational costs.”

“The continuous search for fuel consumption efficiency is one of the key points of Alitalia’s strategy to offer high-value solutions for shareholders and customers, while at the same time reducing the environmental impact to air transportation,” said Alessandro Loddo, Fuel Manager at Alitalia. “The selection of GE’s OnPoint Fuel and Carbon Solutions reinforces the Alitalia focus on technology innovation and paves the way for a structural enhancement of the company’s operational efficiency.”

Part of GE’s ecomagination portfolio, Fuel & Carbon Solutions deliver results through a three-step process:
1. Operational evaluation: Identify and collect data on the airline’s current fuel and carbon reduction programs, and quantify where the customer is today.
2. Customized solution design: Further analyze data to isolate and prioritize potential improvements.
3. Implementation support and verification: Work with customers to implement changes, and then measure and validate savings.

Fuel typically accounts for about 30 percent of an airline’s expenses. With volatility in fuel prices during the last three years, airlines are looking for ways to manage this major portion of their cost base more effectively. Fuel & Carbon Solutions is one way for GE to work with its customers and develop effective fuel management solutions.

Alitalia is Italy’s biggest airline with flights to 79 destinations – 26 in Italy and 53 international. The airline operates 4,500 flights weekly with a fleet of 149 aircraft.

GE Aviation, an operating unit of GE (NYSE: GE), is a world-leading provider of jet and turboprop engines, components and integrated systems for commercial, military, business and general aviation aircraft. GE Aviation has a global service network to support these offerings. For more information, visit us at www.ge.com/aviation. Follow GE Aviation on Twitter at http://twitter.com/GEAviation and YouTube at http://www.youtube.com/user/GEAviation. For more information on ecomagination, visit http://www.ecomagination.com.

Jean-Paul Ebanga Named New CFM President

-West Chester, Ohio– Jean-Paul Ebanga has assumed the role of president and chief executive officer of CFM International.

CFM International (CFM), the 50/50 joint company between Snecma (Safran group) and General Electric Company, is headquartered in West Chester, Ohio, near Cincinnati. The two parent companies have extended the 36-year-old partnership agreement to the year 2040.

Mr. Ebanga is replacing Eric Bachelet, who had served as CFM president and CEO since September 2005. Mr. Bachelet has accepted the position of Safran executive vice president of Research and Technology.

Mr. Ebanga joined Snecma in 1988 after leaving Royal Philips. His assignments at Snecma have included leadership positions in electronics, systems and aircraft engines.

In 2001, Mr. Ebanga was named vice president and general manager of Snecma Control Systems. He was subsequently appointed vice president of Snecma’s Commercial Engine Division.

Most recently, Mr. Ebanga served as chairman and CEO of PowerJet, a joint company between Snecma and Saturn (Russia). He had held that position since 2007.

Mr. Ebanga is a graduate of the ENSEM Graduate School of Engineering in France

CFM has delivered a total of more than 21,600 CFM56 engines to date, making it one of the most successful aircraft engine suppliers in history. Through December 2010, the company had received firm orders for a total of 27,500 engines.

Thomas Cook Selects CFM56-5B to Power New A321s In $200 Million Engine Order

–West Chester, Ohio– Thomas Cook Group today announced that it has selected the CFM56-5B engine to power 12 Airbus A321 aircraft scheduled for delivery in 2014. The engine order is valued at more than $200 million U.S. at list price. The new airplane order was signed earlier today.

In addition to the firm aircraft order, Thomas Cook Group also plans to lease CFM56-5B-powered A320 family aircraft from operating lessors.

Thomas Cook Group plc is one of the worlds leading leisure travel groups and operates a total fleet of more than 90 aircraft and carries 17 million passengers each year. The fleet is split into four airlines: the UK airline, the German airline flying under the Condor brand, the Scandinavian and Belgian airlines.

All of Thomas Cook’s new CFM56-5B engines will incorporate an engine performance improvement package. The modifications will reduce engine fuel consumption by 0.5 percent and lower maintenance costs by 1 percent.

The CFM56-5B PIP is currently undergoing flight tests at Airbus and is schedule for certification in the second quarter 2011. Airline entry into service is planned for the third quarter 2011. The engine will maintain the same noise signature as the current production engine. These engines also meet current International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) Committee of Aviation Environmental Protection standards (CAEP /6) requirements.

CFM56-5B engines are a product of CFM International, a 50/50 joint company between Snecma (Safran group) and GE. CFM, the world’s leading supplier of commercial aircraft engines, has delivered more than 21,600 engines to date. The CFM56-5B engine powers every model of the Airbus A320 family and has been chosen to power approximately 55 percent of all A320 aircraft in service or on order.

American Airlines Orders Two GE90-Powered Boeing 777s

–EVENDALE, OHIO– American Airlines has ordered two new GE90-115B-powered Boeing 777-300ER aircraft. The aircraft will be delivered in late 2012.

“GE Aviation is very pleased that American Airlines will be the first U.S. airline to operate the Boeing 777-300ER aircraft,” said Kevin McAllister, vice president and general manager of global sales for GE Aviation. “American and GE enjoy a relationship that started in the late 1960s, with American being the launch customer for the CF6-6 powered DC10-10. The entire GE team is excited to see that American will soon be operating our most advanced turbofan engine in service, the GE90-115B.”

The Boeing 777-300ER, -200LR and 777 Freighters powered by GE90-115B engines have been highly popular aircraft/engine combinations. More than 580 of these aircraft have been ordered by 43 customers worldwide.

At 115,000 pounds of thrust, the GE90-115B engine combines advanced technologies from the GE90 family with three-dimensional aerodynamic (3-D aero) compressor and wide-chord, swept composite fan blades for greater efficiency. The dual annular combustor emits no more than 40 percent of the hydrocarbons allowed by today’s international standards. Since entering service in 2004, the GE90-115B engine has proven to be one of the quietest engines per pound of thrust.

Snecma of France, Avio SpA of Italy, and IHI Corporation of Japan are revenue-sharing participants in the GE90 program.

The GE90-115B engine is part of GE’s “ecomagination” product portfolio — GE’s commitment to develop new, cost-effective technologies that enhance customers’ environmental and operating performance.

Alagro Fumigaciones Named Authorized Service Center for GE’s M601 and H80 Engines

–EVENDALE, OHIO– Alagro Fumigaciones has signed an agreement with GE Aviation to become an Authorized Service Center for the M601 and H80 turboprop engines.

As part of the agreement, Alagro Fumigaciones will offer comprehensive line maintenance, removals and re-installations of engines and LRUs and engine spares for the M601 and H80 engine families. GE Aviation will provide Alagro with comprehensive material support and training.

“Alagro Fumigaciones is a well-known service provider in South America with more than 40 years of experience in the marketplace,” said Paul Theofan, president and managing executive of GE Aviation’s Business and General Aviation Turboprops. “With Alagro as an authorized service center, GE Aviation can better support its M601 and future H80 operators in the region.”

Alagro Fumigaciones, located in Funes, Argentina, specializes in maintenance and repair of aircraft. Alagro provides engine inspections, airworthiness extensions, airworthiness approvals in Argentina, and a variety of repairs for aircraft and airframes. In addition to working with more than 90 customers across Argentina, Alagro also collaborates on repairs and production with Ecuador, Uruguay and Brazil.

In 2009, Premier Turbines was selected as a Designated Repair Center in South and North Americas for GE’s M601 and, once in service, the H80 turboprop engines. As a Designated Repair Center, Premier Turbines offers heavy repair services, full test capabilities, exchange engines and rentals, line replacement unit rotable pools and field service support to all existing and future M601 and H80 engines in the Americas region. GE Aviation provides the necessary OEM parts to meet Premier Turbines’ needs.

GE Aviation’s Business & General Aviation Turboprops has more than 1,600 M601 engines in service that have accumulated more than 17 million flight hours on 30 applications. Flight testing on the H80 engine continues on the Thrush 510G aircraft. The H80 is undergoing certification testing and will power business and general aviation, utility and agriculture aircraft. The H80 engine combines the elegant, robust design of the M601 engine with GE’s 3-D aerodynamic design techniques and advanced materials to create a more powerful, fuel-efficient, durable engine compared with the M601 engine, with no recurrent fuel nozzle inspections and no hot section inspection. The H80 engine will also feature an extended service life of 3,600 flight-hours or 6,600 cycles between overhauls, significantly enhanced hot-day takeoff performance and high-altitude cruise speeds. The H80 will provide the option of a single- or dual-acting governor, allowing customers flexibility in propeller selection.

GE Aviation, an operating unit of GE (NYSE: GE), is a world-leading provider of jet and turboprop engines, components and integrated systems for commercial, military, business and general aviation aircraft. GE Aviation has a global service network to support these offerings. For more information, visit us at www.ge.com/aviation. Learn more about GE Business & General Aviation at http://facebook.com/GEBGA. Follow GE Aviation on Twitter at http://twitter.com/GEAviation and YouTube at http://www.youtube.com/user/GEAviation.

GE Aviation’s 2011 M601 Line Maintenance Training Schedule

GE Aviation is offering M601 Line Maintenance Training at its Customer Technical Education Center (CTEC) in Cincinnati, Ohio. There are two sessions available – March 7 to 8 and Oct. 31 to Nov. 1.

The first two M601E Line Maintenance courses were held at CTEC last year. The Air Transport Authority (ATA) level III course includes classroom and hands-on training for line maintenance mechanics and aircraft operators. Instructors will provide training on inspections, layout and operation, engine airflow, oil systems and components, fuel systems and components, exhaust systems, reduction gearboxes, air inlet, compressor section, power turbine section, combustion chambers, engine maintenance practices and general troubleshooting.

To reserve your slot, contact Jennifer. For any questions regarding the course, contact Andrew Pierson. For more information about CTEC, visit http://geaviation.com/services/ctec.

GE Aviation’s Business & General Aviation Turboprops has more than 1,600 M601 engines in service that have accumulated more than 17 million flight hours on 30 applications. The M601E-11 engine is the workhorse version of the proven M601 series engines for use in agriculture and utility aircraft applications. With no hot section inspection requirement and an internal fuel slinger free of recurrent fuel nozzle maintenance, the M601E engine provides distinct cost-of-ownership advantages.

Flight testing on the H80 engine continues on the Thrush 510G aircraft. The H80 engine is undergoing certification testing and will power business and general aviation, utility and agriculture aircraft. The H80 engine combines the elegant, robust design of the M601 engine with GE’s 3-D aerodynamic design techniques and advanced materials to create a more powerful, fuel-efficient, durable engine compared with the M601 engine, with no recurrent fuel nozzle inspections and no hot section inspection. The H80 engine will also feature an extended service life of 3,600 flight-hours or 6,600 cycles between overhauls, significantly enhanced hot-day takeoff performance and high-altitude cruise speeds. The H80 will provide the option of a single- or dual-acting governor, allowing customers flexibility in propeller selection.

GE Aviation, an operating unit of GE (NYSE: GE), is a world-leading provider of jet and turboprop engines, components and integrated systems for commercial, military, business and general aviation aircraft. GE Aviation has a global service network to support these offerings. For more information, visit us at www.ge.com/aviation. Learn more about GE Business & General Aviation at http://facebook.com/GEBGA. Follow GE Aviation on Twitter at http://twitter.com/GEAviation and YouTube at http://www.youtube.com/user/GEAviation.

GE and AVIC Sign Agreement for Integrated Avionics Joint Venture

GE Aviation of the United States and Aviation Industry Corporation of China (AVIC) today announced the signing of the agreement to form their new joint venture company. Chinese Commerce Minister Chen Deming and the U.S. Commerce Secretary Gary Locke witnessed the public signing by David Joyce, president and CEO of GE Aviation and Zhang Xinguo, vice president of AVIC today in Chicago.

The new AVIC and GE joint venture company will develop and market integrated, open architecture avionics systems to the global commercial aerospace industry for new aircraft platforms. This system will be the central information system and backbone of the airplane’s networks and electronics and will host the airplane’s avionics, maintenance and utility functions. GE and AVIC will continue to service their legacy programs and existing contracts with customers. The agreement is subject to government approvals and the issuance of an operating license.

This 50/50 joint venture represents a significant milestone in the growing aerospace relationship between Chinese aviation industry and GE Aviation since the mid-1980s. Chinese airlines now operate more than 2,500 jet engines produced by GE and CFM International (joint company of GE and Snecma), with an additional 1,000 engines on back order. GE Aviation’s collaboration in China also involves investment in a network of facilities for technical training, manufacturing, spare parts distribution, and engine maintenance and overhaul. Additionally, GE is powering China’s new ARJ21 regional aircraft and CFMI was selected to power the new Chinese C919 aircraft.

The new GE-AVIC joint venture extends the relationship beyond engines into commercial avionics. It will enable GE and AVIC to grow a business together that will create jobs globally, including hundreds of new jobs in the US, the UK and China.

“GE is extremely pleased and excited to be a part of this unique aviation business. The JV will build on the extensive avionics capabilities of both companies and create a technology center of excellence to serve the commercial aviation market,” said David Joyce. “GE’s aviation business in China results in 1,800 high-technology jobs in the U.S. The jobs are involved in producing and supporting jet engines for China, as well as developing the new engine and avionics system for the C919.”

The joint venture company will be headquartered in China and will be the single route-to-market for integrated avionics systems for both GE and AVIC for new commercial aircraft. Also, GE and AVIC will each provide avionics products to the joint venture company as a customer and distributor.

“The combination of AVIC and GE’s aviation experience, technical know-how and people skills will lead to the development of highly competitive commercial avionics products,” said Zhang Xinguo. “AVIC is looking forward to a long and successful partnership.”

The name of the joint venture is GE-AVIC Civil Avionics Systems Company Limited. The joint venture will have its Chairman and General Manager nominated by AVIC and GE respectively with final approval from its board of directors. The company will be initially located at Zizhu Digital Hub Science Park in Shanghai until a permanent location is secured.

“The joint venture will work to secure systems and other avionics products on future aircraft adding to the overall economic value and jobs created,” said Lorraine Bolsinger, president and CEO of GE Aviation Systems. “The JV and C919 program will support and maintain at least 300 high-tech jobs locally in each the US and China. This venture will challenge our team to come up with break-through technology. GE and AVIC will together develop a world-class engineering organization and the JV itself will be creating new IP and new technology. This is a 50/50 partnership; you have to be all in and be very committed.”

The initial focus for the joint venture is integrated avionics systems for the C919 aircraft. This selection was formalized in a Letter of Intent with COMAC memorialized in a public signing on July 12, 2010. COMAC anticipates delivering more than 2300 C919 aircraft over the 20-year life of the program. This market potential provides an estimated value for the AVIC GE avionics systems of approximately $2 billion.

Jeff Immelt, Chairman and CEO of GE and Lin Zuoming, president of AVIC, originally signed the framework agreement on November 15, 2009 regarding the formation of the visionary joint venture and the intention of jointly creating a market-leading integrated avionics system supplier.

Since a major restructuring in November 2008, the AVIC Group has been ranked in the Fortune’s Global 500 list with a diversified aviation business portfolio ranging from helicopter-making to plane manufacturing. The company has also developed strong capabilities to supply avionics products to various models of aircrafts, both for military and civil use. AVIC has also been active in extensive international exchange and cooperation, viewing all industrial players in the aviation space globally as potential partners.

China Aviation Industry Corporation (AVIC) is an ultra large state-owned enterprise and an investment institution, authorized and managed by the Central People’s Government. It is reorganized from AVIC I and AVIC II. The AVIC group oversees a wide range of business units, including defense, transport aircraft, aviation engine, helicopters, avionics, electromechanical systems, general aviation aircraft, aviation research and development, flight test, trade & logistics and asset management. It has nearly 200 subsidiaries (branches) and over 20 listed companies with a total of 400,000 employees. AVIC was ranked 330th in the Global Fortune 500 for 2010. It was the first Chinese aviation industrial company to make it into the rarified league. For more information, please visitwww.avic.com.cn.

GE Aviation, an operating unit of GE (NYSE: GE), is a world-leading provider of jet engines, components and integrated systems for commercial, military, business and general aviation aircraft. GE has a global service network to support these offerings.

GE Aviation’s Flight Management System Provides Technology behind Southwest Airlines RNP

January 12, 2011
GE Aviation’s Flight Management System Provides Technology behind Southwest Airlines RNP
–Grand Rapids, MI — GE Aviation’s flight management system TrueCourseTM is providing the technology to enable Southwest Airlines’ pilots to begin flying Required Navigation Performance (RNP) procedures at 11 airports. TrueCourse is standard on all Boeing 737 aircraft. RNP is a satellite-based navigation that brings together the accuracy of GPS (Global Positioning System), the capabilities of advanced aircraft avionics, and new flight procedures.

With RNP/NextGen procedures designed at 11 Southwest airports, Southwest Airlines’ projected savings is $16 million a year, with an anticipated savings of more than $60 million per year once all Southwest airports have efficient RNP procedures.

“TrueCourse enables operators to fly the most efficient RNP operations available,” said Chris Beaufait, president of Avionics for GE Aviation Systems. “Southwest is well equipped and is positioning to lead the way in the expansive use of these approved routes realizing fuel, emission and noise reductions.”

The TrueCourse flight management system controls the aircraft track to an accuracy of 10 meters (33 feet) and the time of arrival to within 10 seconds to any point in the flight plan. Benefits include the ability to fly shorter flight paths and idle-thrust descents which reduces fuel consumption, thereby lowering emissions and community noise levels. Software and hardware updates provide the latest technology to continue to meet the needs of the world’s evolving airspace requirements, offering safe and efficient improvements to aircraft operations and dispatch reliability.

Southwest Airlines’ pilots and dispatchers now follow these new efficient flight procedures and enhanced avionics to fly specifically designed satellite-based navigation approaches. The primary airports with efficient RNP procedures include Amarillo*, Birmingham, Boise, Corpus Christi*, Los Angeles, Chicago Midway, Oakland, Oklahoma City, West Palm Beach, Raleigh-Durham, and San Jose.

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