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Tag: <span>John F Kennedy</span>

American Airlines Plane Makes Emergency Landing in New York after Lightning Strike

American AirlinesAmerican Airlines flight AA-4233 had to divert and make an emergency landing at John. F. Kennedy Airport, New York, on March 17.

The Embraer ERJ-175, en-route from Raleigh, North Carolina to La Guardia Airport, NY was struck by lightning, due to which the crew diverted for a safe landing.

The plane landed safely.

All 55 passengers and 4 crew members onboard remained unhurt.

Air Canada Plane Makes Emergency Landing in New York

Air CanadaAir Canada flight AC-942 had to divert and make an emergency landing at John F. Kennedy Airport, New York, USA, on March 2nd.

The Airbus A319-100, heading from Toronto, Canada, to Bermuda, was mid air above Atlantic Ocean when the crew reported engine stall, causing the plane to divert.

The plane landed uneventfully.

No one was injured.

Virgin Atlantic Plane Returns to Heathrow Airport after Laser Strike

Virgin Atlantic flight VS-25 had to return and make an emergency landing at Heathrow Airport in London, United Kingdom, on February 14.

The Airbus A340-600 took off for John F. Kennedy International Airport, New York, but had to return shortly afterwards after the first officer became sick due to a laser strike.

The plane landed safely. There were 252 passengers and 15 crew members aboard at the time; all of them remained injured.

AA Plane Diverts to Heathrow Airport with Cracked Windshield

American AirlinesAmerican Airlines flight 199 had to make an emergency landing at Heathrow Airport, London, England, on November 28.

The Boeing 767-300, en-route from Milan–Malpensa Airport, Italy, to John F. Kennedy International Airport, New York, had to be diverted after its windshield shattered midair.

The plane landed safely. There were 183 passengers and 12 crew members aboard at the time; all of them remained unhurt.

The airline accommodated passengers in other flights.

The incident is being investigated.

Brussels Bound Delta Airlines Plane Rejects Take-off due to Engine Problem

250px-Delta_logo.svgDelta Airlines flight DL-42 rejected takeoff at John F. Kennedy International Airport, New York, on November 2.

The Boeing 767-300, en-route to Brussels, Belgium, had to abort taking off due to maintenance issue with its engine.

The plane returned to the terminal uneventfully.

No injuries were reported.

Aer Lingus Plane Returns to JFK due to Hydraulic Failure

Aer LingusAer Lingus flight 110 had to return and make an emergency landing at John F. Kennedy International Airport, New York, on September 28.

The Boeing 757 that took off for Shannon airport, Ireland, was diverted after the pilot reported landing gear door problems, hydraulic failure, and no flaps.

Fire was sparked in the left rear brakes as the plane touched the runway. Emergency responders immediately extinguished the fire and all 104 passengers were transported back to the terminal safely.

FAA and Port Authority of New York and New Jersey Reach Agreement on Airport Safety Violations

WASHINGTON – The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey (PANYNJ) have reached a settlement agreement about aircraft rescue and firefighting (ARFF) violations from December 2010 to June 2012 at four New York area airports owned and operated by the PANYNJ — John F. Kennedy, Teterboro, LaGuardia, and Newark Liberty International.

“We expect all airports to comply with our safety regulations and to correct any deficiencies immediately,” said U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood. “These violations were egregious, and they will not be tolerated.”

Under the agreement, the PANYNJ agrees to pay a $3.5 million fine within 30 days. If there is a violation of the settlement agreement, the FAA will impose an additional fine of $1.5 million and will assess an additional $27,500 daily for each violation. In addition to the fine, the PANYNJ has agreed to take the following actions, with FAA approval, to address the underlying problems that led to systemic noncompliance with ARFF requirements at the four airports:

  • The Port Authority will create a dedicated ARFF force to carry out airport-related ARFF functions with no collateral police officer duties.
  • The staff will report directly to the Department of Aviation and be operational no later than March 31, 2014.
  • The Port Authority will hire an ARFF fire chief and facility captains as soon as possible, but no later than March 31, 2014.
  • The Port Authority will submit a curriculum for training to the FAA on or before December 31, 2013, which includes at least 75 hours of initial ARFF training and 40 hours of annual recurrent firefighting training in addition to Part 139 training, pertaining to an airport’s operational and safety standards and providing for such things as firefighting and rescue.
  • The ARFF personnel will work a 12-hour shift.
  • The Port Authority will amend the airport certification manuals for the four airports to include: an organizational chart; a process to maintain ARFF training records; and a description of ARFF operations, including shift assignments, personnel training records management, and Department of Aviation oversight.
  • The Port Authority will conduct monthly internal audits of ARFF training and shift assignments and annual external audits to ensure that all ARFF personnel assigned to a shift are trained.

“We expect the Port Authority to have trained safety personnel to ensure the safety of the travelling public and airport personnel, just like we have at all airports in the United States,” said FAA Administrator Michael P. Huerta.

The FAA became aware of ARFF violations as a result of an annual airport certification safety inspection of JFK in December 2011. The FAA also discovered similar violations at Teterboro, which prompted a full review of training at LaGuardia, Newark Liberty International, and Stewart International Airports. The review of ARFF training revealed violations at LaGuardia and Newark, with no violations at Stewart.

The FAA believes the settlement agreement provides the best long-term solution to ensure ARFF compliance, given the systemic nature of the PANYNJ airport problems.

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