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Tag: <span>Hazardous Materials Violations</span>

FAA Proposes $54,000 Civil Penalty Against Interscience for Alleged Hazardous Materials Violations

fine owed the FAA
Press release

WASHINGTON, DC– The U.S Department of Transportation’s Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) proposes a $54,000 civil penalty against Interscience of Saint-Nom-la-Breteche, France, for allegedly violating the Hazardous Materials Regulations.

The FAA alleges that on December 21, 2016, Interscience offered six plastic bottles of flammable liquid disinfectant spray to American Airlines for shipment by air from Blagnac, France, to Nuevo Leon, Mexico.

Workers at the American Airlines cargo facility at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport discovered the shipment.

The FAA alleges the package was not accompanied by a shipper’s declaration of dangerous goods and was not properly classed, described, packaged, marked, labeled or in the proper condition for shipment. The agency also alleges Interscience failed to ensure that each of its employees received required hazardous materials training, and failed to provide emergency response information with the shipment.

Interscience has 30 days from receipt of the FAA’s enforcement letter to respond to the agency.

FAA Proposes $50,000 Civil Penalty Against DebMed USA for Alleged Hazardous Materials Violations

fine owed the FAA
Press release

WASHINGTON, DC–The U.S Department of Transportation’s Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) proposes a $50,000 civil penalty against DebMed USA LLC, of Charlotte, North Carolina, for allegedly violating the Hazardous Materials Regulations.

The FAA alleges that on June 22, 2016, DebMed offered 142 lithium metal batteries to American Airlines for transportation by air from Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport to San Francisco, CA, in the checked baggage of a DebMed employee.

Lithium metal batteries are prohibited as air cargo on passenger aircraft and are also prohibited in checked baggage. Airline passengers may only carry uninstalled, spare lithium batteries in carry-on baggage when the batteries are for personal use in portable electronic devices.

Airline baggage is not an authorized method for companies to move lithium batteries or other hazardous materials. The rules for carrying lithium batteries and lithium battery- powered devices as an airline passenger are available on the FAA website.

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